UNESCO recognises Belgian carillon culture

UNESCO recognises Belgian carillon culture

“After a very thorough selection process by UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage, the Belgian application was the only one that was selected.”

Joëlle Milquet congratulated both bell-ringers and carillon music enthusiasts for their continued efforts to protect this intangible heritage and adapt it to our times. “Carillon music is the voice of our cities. Today it still greatly contributes to the quality of life in urban areas”, she said.

http://thebrusselstimes.com/art-culture/unesco-recognises-belgian-carillon-culture

Heritage in crisis (K. Pomian, 2014)

Pomian’s thoughts, although framed in the context of the argument for the inter-marrying of digitisation and material continuity in preservation, speak to the fundamental motivation for maintaining tangible links to cultural heritage. To talk about cultural heritage is to talk about the future. People tried to leave what they believe to be the most precious for […]

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9 places that reveal the hidden history of the cold war

9 places that reveal the hidden history of the cold war

http://heritagecalling.com/2014/11/08/9-places-that-reveal-the-hidden-history-of-the-cold-war/

The buildings of the Cold War are some of our last physical links to this episode of our history. They bear witness to phenomena such as the development and deployment of nuclear weapons, the ‘special relationship’ between the UK and the US, constant global surveillance, and huge expenditure on science and technology research as well as defence.

England was divided into nine regions which, in the event of nuclear war, would have each been governed by Regional Commissioners housed, along with civil servants, in heavily protected buildings.  This complex in Cambridge, one of only two purpose-built Regional Seats of Government built during the early 1960s, making it a rare example of a structure designed to operate after a nuclear attack.  It has thick external walls to resist blast, heat and radiation penetration, and is equipped with an air filtration plant, standby generators, canteens, dormitories, operations rooms and communications facilities.

Westminster ‘Big Ben’ material authenticity, or lack thereof

Westminster ‘Big Ben’ material authenticity, or lack thereof

The clock tower, Palace of Westminster, London, popularly known as Big Ben, was originally built of Magnesian Limestone. Stone from Bolsover Moor quarry was used for the plinth with Anston Stone above. About 50 per cent of the stones above the plinth have now been replaced with Clipsham Stone.

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Is it better to maintain original materials or replace them with a more sustainable alternative?

Ashurst, J. & Dimes, F. G. (1998). Conservation of Building and Decorative Stone, vol. 2 of Butterworth-Heinemann Series in Conservation and Museology. Oxford : Butterworth-Heinemann, plate 1.

 

 

 

Historic Preservation Vs. Sustainability?

Historic Preservation Vs. Sustainability?

The greenest buildings are the ones that are already built. But how does a community balance the historic fabric of vernacular architecture with greener buildings? Can’t we have both?

A discussion with: Maria Casarella, AIA, Cunningham | Quill Architects; Anna Dyson, director, Center for Architecture Science & Ecology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute & Skidmore, Owings and Merrill; Martin Moeller, senior vice president, National Building Museum (moderator), Brendan Owens, Vice President LEED Technical Development, U.S. Green Building Council; Eleni Reed, Chief Greening Officer, Public Buildings Service, U.S. General Services Administration

Managing references and citations as a Pages user

It’s no secret that handling references and citations is complicated. In response, there are many products available to handle various aspects of collecting, managing, and integrating references for research purposes — in addition to collaborating and sharing resources. Recent products have provided the ability to handle these tasks with a single suite of web/desktop plugins and standalone software: […]

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The buildings that won the national lottery jackpot – the hits and misses

The buildings that won the national lottery jackpot – the hits and misses

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/nov/02/national-lottery-funding-buildings-won-jackpot-architecture-hits-and-misses

[The national lottery fund] helped launch the ill-conceived idea that to “regenerate” a place you need only install a cultural icon and leave the rest to the private sector.

Like many other lottery projects, the Space Centre is in an off-centre location, being seen as a catalyst for regeneration. It was a worthy idea, and sometimes worked, but it hit two snags: one was that, if the prospects of a place were too dire, a jaunty bit of hi-techery was not enough to rescue them; the other was the modern British inability to plan new places coherently or well, and thus extend the architectural ambition of the lottery building to its immediate surroundings.

Symphonic works in times of conflict

I’ve recently stumbled upon Enescu’s Symphony Nº 3. Composed in 1918 (rev. 1921), it is an evocative tone poem for orchestra and choir of images relatable to the suffering Enescu would have witnessed throughout the First World War. It immediately called to mind Bernstein’s Age of Anxiety, which led to a few thoughts on the role of symphonic and orchestral […]

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